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  1. #1
    Jenna's Avatar
    Jenna is offline sheep
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    3-D printers could allow gun owners to print high capacity ammo magazines to get around gun laws

    Gun owners who can't buy high capacity ammo magazines because of new laws have another option: Print them.Gun control measures passed or proposed in the wake of the Sandy Hook school massacre have targeted magazines that can feed 30 rounds or more into the firing chambers of AR-15s and other semi-automatic guns. New York has banned magazines holding more than seven rounds, and a federal bill proposed by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., would ban magazines holding more than 10 rounds.But the laws are at least one step behind technology. Using 3D printers and schematics available on the Internet, gun owners can manufacture a fully functional, plastic magazine clip. Plans are free, although getting access to a 3D printer may prove expensive, at least for now.
    “If you can download it, you can have it,” said University of Texas law student Cody Wilson, who is part of Defense Distributed, a group that has created the design for what they refer to as a “Cuomo Clip” along with other gun parts. It is all under an initiative they refer to as the Wiki Weapon Project.
    The “Cuomo Clip,” named for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who pushed the high-capacity clip ban through the Legislature, is made from a plastic filament similar to the type of material used to manufacture LEGO building blocks. It is also loaded with a large spring that helps to push rounds of ammo into the gun chamber.The ammo magazine clip appears to be durable; Defense Distributed test-fired 86 rounds from a 30-round prototype last month, and the clip showed no signs of damage.The cutting edge technology, in which three-dimensional objects can be manufactured from melted plastic thread, is likely to complicate efforts to control firearms. No such ability existed in 1994, when large-capacity clips were first banned in an initial federal assault weapons ban that lasted a decade.


    Read more: Print and fire: 3D printing could muzzle new gun laws | Fox News

  2. #2
    lewisipso's Avatar
    lewisipso is offline Injustice/Indifference/In God we trust
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    And how does that stop the possession portion of the problem? Not that it matters, I'm good. Now if I could just find more ammo.
    Do not war for peace. If you must war, war for justice. For without justice there is no peace. -me

    We are who we choose to be.

    R.I.P. Arielle. 08/20/2010-09/16/2012


  3. #3
    bayern's Avatar
    bayern is offline Officer First Class
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    The matching duplicates the item it is making (the shape), not the innards (springs, etc). It is basically a lump of plastic shaped in any form you want. Now, the very first Glock was made of ceramics type material. the only "metal" was the firing pin spring and the magazine spring. EVERYTHING else was made of ceramics; undetectable by metal detector. Thats what everysone went bonkers about when Glock wanted to import gunds waaaay back. It was never imported and only a few were made and stayed in Austria and some in Germany to be used by Etra-special units (whose names are never mentioned).

  4. #4
    Odd's Avatar
    Odd
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    Early 3D printers could only make molds off external shapes. The process has evolved quite a bit since - to the point some of the things sound like sci-fi to me. (not that I'm complaining) We're in an era today when 3D printing a moon base is a serious consideration: printing a box with a spring in it is a matter of fit.

  5. #5
    Odd's Avatar
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    Related update...
    Download this gun: 3D-printed semi-automatic fires over 600 rounds | Ars Technica

    Last year, his group famously demonstrated that it could use a 3D-printed “lower” for an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle—but the gun failed after six rounds. Now, after some re-tooling, Defense Distributed has shown that it has fixed the design flaws and a gun using its lower can seemingly fire for quite a while.

    “This is the first publicly printed AR lower demonstrated to withstand a large volume of .223 without structural degradation or failure,” Wilson wrote on Wednesday. “The actual count was 660+ on day 1 with the SLA lower. The test ended when we ran out of ammunition, but this lower could easily withstand 1,000 rounds.”

 

 

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