Almost had me with them til this:
Since the complaint, Ottawa has eliminated wardens' law-enforcement duties dealing with crime, liquor infractions and traffic offences to cut the risk and confined their legal work to conservation matters such as poaching, illegally cut wood and fires.
OK, correct me if I am wrong: But isn't dealing with POACHING kind of risky?

Well at least they aint at risk of a Poacher...
Mr. Martin, who has more than 30 years experience with the national parks, explained that wardens have to deal with armed hunters and quell disturbances at campsites where there are "weapons of opportunity" such as axes, knives and wood.
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Wardens ordered to cease law-enforcement duties

DAWN WALTON

May 12, 2007

CALGARY -- Ottawa has ordered national park wardens to hand in their badges, batons and body armour and cease all law-enforcement duties after a recent federal ruling instructed Parks Canada to arm its workers with handguns due to the dangers posed on the job.

During legal wrangling that has lasted seven years, Ottawa has resisted calls to equip its 400 wardens in the country's 42 national parks with side arms, insisting workers don't need handguns, and it has pared down requirements of the job to minimize the hazards.

"We don't have a body of data to tell us that there's risk there that warrants the issuance of a sidearm," said Doug Stewart, director-general of national parks for the federal agency.

But the decision, released this week by Douglas Malanka, an officer with the Canada Appeals Office on Occupational Health and Safety, concluded that a side arm is "necessary and appropriate" given the risks national park wardens face.

As a result, all law-enforcement duties and the appearance of wardens as peace officers have been taken away while Ottawa studies the decision and considers whether it will appeal. In the meantime, Parks Canada has asked workers to contact the RCMP or Environment Canada officers if they believe a law is being broken in a park.

"It's an unfortunate circumstance, but we must comply with Mr. Malanka's direction," Mr. Stewart said.

The Public Service Alliance of Canada, the union that represents the wardens, applauded the appeals office decision and urged Parks Canada to forgo a further appeal.

"I would like to think that Parks Canada would recognize that this is the right thing to do," said PSAC national executive vice-president Patty Ducharme.

The case dates back to 2000, when Banff warden Doug Martin filed a complaint under Canada's Labour Code arguing that his job put him in potentially dangerous situations without the tools to protect himself.

Not all wardens agree, but others point to provincial conservation officers across the country who are allowed to carry handguns. Federal fisheries and wildlife officers also have access to side arms.

Mr. Martin, who has more than 30 years experience with the national parks, explained that wardens have to deal with armed hunters and quell disturbances at campsites where there are "weapons of opportunity" such as axes, knives and wood.

Since the complaint, Ottawa has eliminated wardens' law-enforcement duties dealing with crime, liquor infractions and traffic offences to cut the risk and confined their legal work to conservation matters such as poaching, illegally cut wood and fires.

Ottawa said it is treating the case with "some urgency," but as the busy summer season approaches in the national parks, which attract 16 million visitors a year, there are fears that Mounties and other conservation officers may be overwhelmed, or miscreants may try to take advantage of the situation.

Ms. Ducharme worries that Mounties, who are not trained in the terrain of the national parks and don't have a specialized understanding of natural resources, may not be able to respond to the need to help with those conservation duties.

"Some of these workers work in remote, isolated environments where they have to ride horses into the national parks," she said.