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  1. #1
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    Angry Milwaukee Police Officer going to jail, and will be deported. Yes, deported...he's an illegal alien, and stole his dead cousin's identity

    A police officer in Milwaukee has agreed to plead guilty to falsely claiming to be a U.S. citizen for taking his dead cousin's identity as a teenager, according to the U.S. attorney's office.

    A plea agreement released last week says prosecutors will recommend a sentence of six to 12 months for Oscar Ayala-Cornejo, 24, who comes from Mexico. The maximum sentence is three years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

    Ayala-Cornejo also agreed to be deported after his prison sentence and resign from the Milwaukee police department, Assistant U.S. Attorney Mel Johnson said.

    In February, a U.S. Department of Homeland Security agent received an anonymous call from someone reporting Ayala-Cornejo was an illegal immigrant but was using the identity of his dead cousin, the complaint says.

    Investigators compared Ayala-Cornejo's driver's license to yearbook photos from two high schools he attended as two different identities, the complaint said. Relatives also admitted Ayala-Cornejo took the identity of Ayala-Cornejo's cousin Jose Morales, who was born in Chicago about seven months before Ayala-Cornejo.

    Jose Morales died of cancer, Morales' brother, Jamie, told authorities. Jamie Morales said his father volunteered Jose's identity when he died, the complaint said.

    Ayala-Cornejo moved from Mexico to the U.S. around 1992, Johnson said.

    He started using Morales' identity in 1999 when he changed high schools in Milwaukee, according to the complaint.

    No sentencing date has been set.

    Police say Ayala-Cornejo's brother, Alexander Ayala, who is also a Milwaukee police officer but is a U.S. citizen, has been assigned to administrative duty.

    Messages left at Ayala-Cornejo's home and for his attorney, Michael Steinle, were not returned Monday.

  2. #2
    Jenna's Avatar
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    This seems very sad to me--it's not like Ayala-Cornejo was depriving anyone, including his cousin, of anything, since his cousin was deceased. And he moved to the US when he was 9, so it was his parents' choice, not his own, for him to become an undocumented immigrant; having grown up in the US he's become culturally American and probably illiterate in Spanish, and adjusting to Mexico will be as hard for him as it would be for any American.

    He took his cousin's identity when he was only 16, below the age of consent by some standards, and it was given to him voluntarily by his cousin's father, out of love. It may have been seen as a moving kind of tribute, in which he would try to console his uncle by taking his deceased cousin's place. Maybe he shouldn't be an LEO, since LEOs can be disqualified for even the most minor instances of lawbreaking, but prison and deportation seems really harsh. He was probably discovered only because he made enemies as an LEO--if he had worked at a non-LEO job and kept a low profile, he could have lived out his life in peace.

  3. #3
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    Jenna's right. Police should be allowed to commit criminal acts all the time!
    "If everyone is thinking alike, then someone isn't thinking." -Gen. George S. Patton

  4. #4
    BEB
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino View Post
    Jenna's right. Police should be allowed to commit criminal acts all the time!
    That wasn't what she said.
    Though I do have some comments on Jenna's post.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    This seems very sad to me--it's not like Ayala-Cornejo was depriving anyone, including his cousin, of anything, since his cousin was deceased.
    Irrelevant. While that was a 'victimless crime' it was one, one perpetrated when he was 16. If anything he screwed himself here.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    And he moved to the US when he was 9, so it was his parents' choice, not his own, for him to become an undocumented immigrant; having grown up in the US he's become culturally American and probably illiterate in Spanish, and adjusting to Mexico will be as hard for him as it would be for any American.
    Wish you'd stopped at 'culturally American'. His choice career of, and qualification for, police officer suggests he is culturally American. That in itself doesn't mean he is illiterate in Spanish or Mexican culture.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    He took his cousin's identity when he was only 16, below the age of consent by some standards, and it was given to him voluntarily by his cousin's father, out of love. It may have been seen as a moving kind of tribute, in which he would try to console his uncle by taking his deceased cousin's place.
    Age 16 : Your choices are
    *Remain in this country living as an illegal alien
    *Remain in this country for a couple more years, return to Mexico
    *Remain in this country for a couple more years, return to Mexico, apply for citizenship in this country
    *Remain in this country as an illegal and apply for citizenship in this country
    *Sign a different name and become a recognized citizen at the next stroke of your own pen.

    All this with family pressure to boot. I can sympathize. I can judge too, but I can't say for certain what I'd do if presented with those options. Keep in mind he'd been here since he was 9. If you can you know for certain what you'd do I'll take you at your word.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    Maybe he shouldn't be an LEO, since LEOs can be disqualified for even the most minor instances of lawbreaking, but prison and deportation seems really harsh. He was probably discovered only because he made enemies as an LEO--if he had worked at a non-LEO job and kept a low profile, he could have lived out his life in peace.
    If he'd gone into real estate he likely never would have been caught. Taking an oath based on a lie was a really poor decision, no doubt about that. He gambled on the false identity holding up; he lost. He bet mightily on that false identity holding up when he chose to be a Law Enforcement Officer; he lost bigger.

    Shame he wasn't born in this country. It seems he couldn't resist the calling.

  5. #5
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    Maybe he shouldn't be an LEO, since LEOs can be disqualified for even the most minor instances of lawbreaking, but prison and deportation seems really harsh. He was probably discovered only because he made enemies as an LEO--if he had worked at a non-LEO job and kept a low profile, he could have lived out his life in peace.
    Yeah... we all understand why society should burn a cop, but to expect ordinary non-citizens to obey the law, apply for citizenship, legal residence status, and not steal dead people's identity is outrageous, eh? Good point, Jenna.

    "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money."
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    Quote Originally Posted by countybear View Post
    Yeah... we all understand why society should burn a cop, but to expect ordinary non-citizens to obey the law, apply for citizenship, legal residence status, and not steal dead people's identity is outrageous, eh? Good point, Jenna.
    On the contrary; I don't think "society should burn a cop" any more than it burns non-cops, which is why I think this poor guy should not have faced such a harsh punishment that non-cops in similar circumstances would most likely not face. It seems like he is facing extra punishment just because he was so devoted to the country he calls home that he became a cop.

    As BEB pointed out, it's a lot to ask a 16-year-old to resist family pressure and choose possibly permanent exile from the country he grew up in to obey a law that many believe is unjust to begin with. It wasn't like he could have easily gotten US citizenship if he had applied for it and was just too lazy to do so; Mexicans living as undocumented immigrants in the US and trying to get US citizenship face an extremely difficult and uncertain process that may well result in permanent exile from the US.

    And it is likely that he is illiterate in Spanish, since he didn't attend school in Mexico. The only way he might be literate in Spanish is if he studied it for a few years in high school and college, but even then his reading and writing skills are not as good as those of Mexicans who studied Spanish all their lives.

    He didn't steal his cousin's identity--it was freely given to him by his uncle after his cousin died, like an inheritance--his cousin probably would have wanted him to have it anyway.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BEB View Post



    Taking an oath based on a lie was a really poor decision, no doubt about that. He gambled on the false identity holding up; he lost. He bet mightily on that false identity holding up when he chose to be a Law Enforcement Officer; he lost bigger.

    Shame he wasn't born in this country. It seems he couldn't resist the calling.
    +1
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    He didn't steal his cousin's identity--it was freely given to him by his uncle after his cousin died, like an inheritance--his cousin probably would have wanted him to have it anyway.


    You can't "give" someone another person's identity.

    That's the problem this guy is wrapped up in.
    No one has greater love than this, to lay down ones life for ones friends - John 15:13

    "The Wicked Flee When No Man Pursueth: But The Righteous Are Bold As A Lion".

    We lucky few, we band of brothers. For he who today sheds his blood with me shall be my brother.

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  9. #9
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    It seems like he is facing extra punishment just because he was so devoted to the country he calls home that he became a cop.
    Funny, I would call obeying its laws more devotion to a country, than attempting to exploit the system...

    It wasn't like he could have easily gotten US citizenship if he had applied for it and was just too lazy to do so; Mexicans living as undocumented immigrants in the US and trying to get US citizenship face an extremely difficult and uncertain process that may well result in permanent exile from the US.
    Given the circumstances, I seriously doubt that ICE (INS back then) would have herded him onto a bus and shipped him. Hell, I can't get them to ship criminal ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS that I catch now, with any frequency... and who said that a requirement for doing the right thing was that it had to be the easy thing to do? Pelosi perhaps?

    He didn't steal his cousin's identity--it was freely given to him by his uncle after his cousin died, like an inheritance--his cousin probably would have wanted him to have it anyway.
    I should have inherited Elvis Presley's legacy, after all, he doesn't need it anymore, and I'll bet he wanted to give it to me after he kicked the old bucket... after all, I could do more good with it than Lisa Marie ever has.

    "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money."
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  10. #10
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    I've had real feelings of ambivilence about this whole situation every since it came to light. The fact is, if this guy was some itinerate farm hand, he would not have been deported. I've seen dozens of cases where the courts let them go with a slap on the wrists and the warning that they COULD be deported. Yet, here we have a man, illegal or not, that is doing something good for the community, and he gets a one-way ticket back. Granted, as a cop, he's held to a higher standard, but he should also be recognized for his contributions made while he was here. If an illegal is found in the Army, and he's served the country in a commendable manner, should they be deported?
    For the morning will come. Brightly will it shine on the brave and true, kindly upon all who suffer for the cause, glorious upon the tombs of heroes. Thus will shine the dawn.

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    What really gets me is what an intense experience it must have been like for him, as a 16-year-old, to answer to the name of his tragically deceased (and probably beloved) cousin every day. He must have been very close to his cousin and his cousin's parents for them to have been willing to go through significant trouble, risk, and pain to help him assume his cousin's identity. Given how difficult it is to hide even minor previous transgressions during the polygraph examinations necessary for LEO employment, I wonder if he passed them because he didn't believe what he did was wrong, and therefore didn't feel guilty enough about it for the examiner to notice. Maybe he felt he was doing something good for his family, by being like a son to his cousin's grieving parents and going on in his cousin's name (literally) to do the things that his cousin dreamed of doing, but never got a chance to do.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by keith720 View Post
    Granted, as a cop, he's held to a higher standard, but he should also be recognized for his contributions made while he was here.

    He is being recognized by not drawing the maximum sentence. I might sound a little harsh but the guy did raise his right hand and swore an oath under God that he would protect the Constitution of both the U.S. and Wisconsin as well as the City of Milwaukee knowing full well he wasn't who he said he was. If we let him off easy what does that say about our hiring process? Or how seriously we take our oaths as LEO's? Do we want to set a precedent where the next guy who's found to be not who he says he is just gets "reassigned" to the property inventory room so as to spare the department embarrasment?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    He didn't steal his cousin's identity--it was freely given to him by his uncle after his cousin died, like an inheritance--his cousin probably would have wanted him to have it anyway.
    Have you finally flipped out completely? Where is your sense of right and wrong? Is everything justifiable in your book?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdb91 View Post
    He is being recognized by not drawing the maximum sentence. I might sound a little harsh but the guy did raise his right hand and swore an oath under God that he would protect the Constitution of both the U.S. and Wisconsin as well as the City of Milwaukee knowing full well he wasn't who he said he was. If we let him off easy what does that say about our hiring process? Or how seriously we take our oaths as LEO's? Do we want to set a precedent where the next guy who's found to be not who he says he is just gets "reassigned" to the property inventory room so as to spare the department embarrasment?
    I am not saying the guy deserves to stay on the job. I'm saying that we need to get a proper perspective on who he is and what he did. Do you know for a fact that he didn't do as his oath said, "protect the constitution of the U.S.?" We don't even send real criminals back to Mexico, and yet we're ready to hang this guy because he had the audacity to try to be one of the good guys! Is this about justice or ego!
    For the morning will come. Brightly will it shine on the brave and true, kindly upon all who suffer for the cause, glorious upon the tombs of heroes. Thus will shine the dawn.

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    We don't even send real criminals back to Mexico, and yet we're ready to hang this guy because he had the audacity to try to be one of the good guys! Is this about justice or ego!
    I see your point, keith, and even to a certain extent I'd say I have to agree with you. They are sticking this guy out because he took a job in law enforcement (and in the process, maybe he cast a shadow on the selection process for his department, as well).

    I refuse however, to say that his actions are less criminal, even with a spotless and untarnished record (which is being assumed here that he had, although there is no information given on that). I am all for giving someone credit for doing this job, it is a thankless one that cannot be fully understood, unless you hit the streets, pin on the badge and do it.

    Here's where I hang on it though... Perhaps the hardest part of doing this job, is that on duty or off, you must be "unsullied, as an example to all..." (remember that part of the law enforcement code of ethics?)

    I am a firm believer that when one of us, (rookie, veteran, or in between) takes a black eye, we all do. The actions of this man, (and mind you, he was a man when he swore a law enforcement officer's oath, with full knowlege that he was being subversive with regards to his identity) call into question the hiring process of his department, the standards by which law enforcement officers are held, and supplant the high regard that the general public should have for its law enforcement officers. Beyond that point, he should have had (or at least developed) a higher regard for his service, his duty, his fellow officers, and the public trust, than to continue within its ranks, knowing such subversion took place to begin with.

    Illegal is illegal. This man took people to jail for much lesser crimes than he, himself was committing. That, my friend, is wrong, no matter how many flowers and care bears you want to surround it with. Call it a rose if you want, but if its shit, it still stinks.

    For the millions of illegals running around freely in the U.S., for those who commit crimes and are still not deported, I consider that to be a complete and total failure of our government in one of its primary duties to its citizens, provision for their security. I also consider it a terrible affront to all LEGAL citizens, especially, those who endured the arduous process of naturalization. The government's pale and vain attempts to re-legislate what it cannot seem to enforce is no more than politically inbred impotency at its worst.

    /rant off

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by countybear View Post
    They are sticking this guy out because he took a job in law enforcement
    That was my impression, and while that is likely true, my opinion (for what it is worth) is that it may seem wrong that they are deporting/imprisoning him because he's a cop, but they are enforcing the law by doing so.

    Dual standards are wrong (and this is a dual standard) but they are doing to him what should be done with all other illegals, so while it upsets me that he is singled out because he's a cop, it does not upset me that they are enforcing the law...if that makes sense.
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  17. #17
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    My 2 cents. 1. He is a FRIGGEN LIAR When he took the job and oath, he was lying. If he lied on his application, did he lie while performing his duties???More than likely, did. He SWORE he was an American Citizen, HE LIED.

    In my book, he is a DIRT BAG and should be FIRED, not allowed to resign.

    Ah, my rant for the day

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    Quote Originally Posted by bayern View Post
    My 2 cents. 1. He is a FRIGGEN LIAR When he took the job and oath, he was lying. If he lied on his application, did he lie while performing his duties???More than likely, did. He SWORE he was an American Citizen, HE LIED.

    In my book, he is a DIRT BAG and should be FIRED, not allowed to resign.

    Ah, my rant for the day
    Saved me the trouble +1 Sorry He swore a false oath..remember they usually start with "I (State YOUR Name)..." Not State your Cousin's name.. IMO the brother needs to go as well. False swearing, False affirmation, Hell EVERY report the guy signed, EVERY complaint he Signed, EVERY time he Testified under oath, He broke a Law... he KNEW his brother had comitted what would be a Felony in MY state..

  19. #19
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    Jenna- you can't call him an "undocumented immigrant". There's plenty of documentation on him. The proper term is "criminal immigrant". Because he committed a criminal act to establish residency.

    I wish I had a slap button for you every time I have to read something you write out of ignorance.

    GD Hippie...

    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Jenna View Post
    He didn't steal his cousin's identity--it was freely given to him by his uncle after his cousin died, like an inheritance--his cousin probably would have wanted him to have it anyway.
    Well, Jenna, I guess that sets a legal precedence, doesn't it? You know what, Jenna. I want you to have all the money in the bank nearest your house. Just walk in and demand them give it to you.

    See? Same logic. Something that doesn't belong to me, I am going to give to you- so that makes it okay.

    You really are a piece of work.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by keith720 View Post
    I've had real feelings of ambivilence about this whole situation every since it came to light. The fact is, if this guy was some itinerate farm hand, he would not have been deported. I've seen dozens of cases where the courts let them go with a slap on the wrists and the warning that they COULD be deported. Yet, here we have a man, illegal or not, that is doing something good for the community, and he gets a one-way ticket back. Granted, as a cop, he's held to a higher standard, but he should also be recognized for his contributions made while he was here. If an illegal is found in the Army, and he's served the country in a commendable manner, should they be deported?
    I agree with what you said.

 

 
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