Welcome to the APBWeb.

View Poll Results: If Marijuana were legalized, would you smoke it?

Voters
32. You may not vote on this poll
  • No

    29 90.63%
  • Yes, I would try it or smoke it occasionally

    0 0%
  • Yes, I would smoke it regularly

    0 0%
  • Unsure

    3 9.38%
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Terminator's Avatar
    Terminator is offline BANNED
    Join Date
    12-03-05
    Location
    None of your business
    Posts
    16,064
    Rep Power
    0

    A marijuana tax as the next new revenue stream?

    San Francisco Are Americans really ready to consider legalizing marijuana? This week, California's governor said it was time to debate the issue, and a new nationwide poll suggests a majority of voters favor decriminalizing the drug.
    While legalization advocates say they've never seen such widespread public support for reforming marijuana laws, they still don't expect drug policy to change overnight. But, they say, the country appears to be at tipping point in how it views recreational use of marijuana, which is now legal in 13 states for medically-approved use.
    "We are actually talking about historic highs when it comes to public support of taxing and regulating marijuana for adult consumption," says Paul Armentano, deputy director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). But, he adds, "the most difficult task is how you convert public sentiment into public policy."
    In Washington, Mr. Armentano says, politicians are still not ready to rethink US drug policy.
    In a poll released Wednesday by Zogby International, 52 percent of voters said they would support legalizing, taxing, and regulating marijuana use.
    The survey asked voters if they would "favor or oppose the government's effort to legalize marijuana?"
    That question may be a bit misleading, suggests Reason Online blogger Jacob Sullum. "The phrase 'the government's effort to legalize marijuana' makes it sound as if this is something that's already happening, which makes the idea seem more realistic and credible."
    Also, the poll surveyed 3,937 voters whose political identities followed the outcome of the last presidential election 54 percent were President Obama supporters and 46 percent voted for Sen. John McCain. "This sample may be skewed in a pro-reform direction if, as seems plausible, left-leaning Americans were especially motivated to vote in the last presidential election, while conservatives were dispirited," he wrote.
    Nonetheless, "It's in line with building support for marijuana legalization in other surveys," Mr. Sullum acknowledged.
    The Zogby findings follow last month's ABC News/Washington Post survey that found 46 percent support for decriminalizing marijuana. And a California Field Poll published April 30 said that 56 percent of state residents were OK with marijuana becoming a taxed and regulated commodity.
    California Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, (D) from San Francisco, has proposed legislation to begin treating marijuana like alcohol giving anyone over 21 the right to use it but taxing it heavily. Taxing marijuana, supporters of Mr. Ammiano's bill say, could bring the cash-strapped state $1.3 billion annually. Already the state collects about $18 million annually from medical marijuana.
    Massachusetts state legislature is also set to consider a bill to tax and regulate the sale and trade of marijuana. Last year, voters there approved an initiative to reduce the punishment for possession of small amounts of marijuana to a $100 civil citation.
    On Tuesday, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger was responding to a question about the potential statewide boon from taxing marijuana when he said: "It's time for debate.... I'm always for an open debate on it."
    Still, he says he does not currently support the idea.
    Neither does Mr. Obama. In late March, at a virtual town hall meeting in which viewers voted online for questions that Obama would take, the most popular question was: "With over 1 out of 30 Americans controlled by the penal system, why not legalize, control, and tax marijuana to change the failed war on drugs into a money making, money saving boost to the economy?"
    Obama answered, to much applause: "I don't think that is a good strategy to grow our economy."
    In response to the president's reply, Jack Cole, executive director of the Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, a drug-policy reform group comprised of current and former law enforcement officers, said: "It would be an enormous economic stimulus if we stopped wasting so much money arresting and locking people up for nonviolent drug offenses and instead brought new tax revenue from legal sales."
    But many other police groups are steadfastly against any form of legalization. The California Police Chiefs Association said that marijuana dispensaries in the state are "a clear violation of federal and state law; they invite more crime; and they compromise the health and welfare of law-abiding citizens."
    Californians approved the medical use of marijuana in 1996, the first state to do so. Today, marijuana is available over the counter throughout the state for anyone with a doctor's permission. In February, US Attorney General Eric Holder said the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) would no longer raid medical marijuana dispensaries, which marijuana advocates saw as a sign of growing federal acceptance of state-specific pot laws. Under the Bush administration, the DEA shuttered at least 40 marijuana dispensers.
    On its website, the DEA maintains: "Smoked marijuana has not withstood the rigors of science it is not medicine and it is not safe. DEA targets criminals engaged in cultivation and trafficking, not the sick and dying."
    Armentano questions whether the spread of medical marijuana laws is really connected with support for legalization.
    He traces the changing stance to three developments: the economic downturn, which is forcing people to consider new sources of revenue; the violent Mexican drug war, which he says many Americans see as the result of prohibition of the drug trade and not directly linked to personal usage; and lastly, more experience with the drug.
    According to the DEA, marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the country. "It's hard to say that using marijuana will ruin your life when the last three American presidents are admitted marijuana users," Armentano says.

  2. #2
    CTR man's Avatar
    CTR man is offline Officer First Class
    Supporting Member Lvl 3
    Join Date
    05-20-06
    Location
    Ceres, CA
    Posts
    4,965
    Rep Power
    1169037
    On its website, the DEA maintains: "Smoked marijuana has not withstood the rigors of science it is not medicine and it is not safe. DEA targets criminals engaged in cultivation and trafficking, not the sick and dying."
    No way in hell am I ever going to smoke that crap. I lost my dad to cancer from smoking cigarettes so this is a touchy issue for me. MJ causes lack of motivation among other things which I am sure everyone here is well aware of. If the doctor wants to give me a script for MJ he had better have it in pill form because I am not smoking that crap.

    IMO any doctor that gives out MJ script is a quack and a fraud. But thats just me. Of course, if all those that want to legalize it will go someplace to smoke it and further remove themselves from the general public, that is perfectly fine with me. Eventually they will die off and we will all be happy.


    Choose The Right. When you're doing whats right, then you have nothing to worry about.

    Not a LEO

    In memory of Sgt. Howard K. Stevenson 1965 - 2005. Ceres Police Dept.
    In memory of Robert N. Panos 1955 - 2008 Ceres Police Dept.









  3. #3
    IMachU's Avatar
    IMachU is offline First Class Private
    Verified LEO
    Join Date
    09-19-08
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    290
    Rep Power
    169674
    I gotta agree. I lost my mom to cigarette smoking, so smoking anything, for me, is a touchy subject. Yeah, it's your body and do to it what you want. Whatever. But the laziness, listlessness, and general pissy attitude exhibited by these hippies is what will be the issue. This is just my opinion, garnered from my years of experience on this planet and in this job.

  4. #4
    121Traffic's Avatar
    121Traffic is offline Just Us
    Verified LEO
    Site Moderator
    Join Date
    01-09-06
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,547
    Rep Power
    6332993
    Quote Originally Posted by CTR man View Post
    No way in hell am I ever going to smoke that crap. I lost my dad to cancer from smoking cigarettes so this is a touchy issue for me. MJ causes lack of motivation among other things which I am sure everyone here is well aware of. If the doctor wants to give me a script for MJ he had better have it in pill form because I am not smoking that crap.

    IMO any doctor that gives out MJ script is a quack and a fraud. But thats just me. Of course, if all those that want to legalize it will go someplace to smoke it and further remove themselves from the general public, that is perfectly fine with me. Eventually they will die off and we will all be happy.
    Since the FDA hasn't actually approved MJ for medicinal use (in fact, it's still against Federal law to possess it...medical marijuana is not recognized), doctors can't and don't actually prescribe it. They just fill out a note that says their patient might benefit from its use. It's a total joke.
    "If anything worthwhile comes of this tragedy, it should be the realization by every citizen that often the only thing that stands between them and losing everything they hold dear... is the man wearing a badge." -- Ronald Reagan, in the wake of the deaths of 4 CHP troopers in the Newhall Incident, 1970

    The opinions given in my posts DO NOT reflect the opinions, views, policies, and/or procedures of my employing agency. They are my personal opinions only, thereby releasing my agency of any liability, or involvement in anything posted under the username "121Traffic" on O/R.

  5. #5
    pgg's Avatar
    pgg
    pgg is online now Damnit, I'm hungry again.
    Verified LEO
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    06-16-08
    Location
    Fled the Emerald Triangle
    Posts
    11,000
    Rep Power
    4046225
    He wants to claim a revenue stream but fails to realize the additional cost this is going to place us the taxpayers. Who is going to pay the health costs.. US. Who is going to pay for their needs and living when they can't support themselves.. US. who is going to have to pay to dispose of their carcasses when they die... US
    'Political Correctness is a doctrine fostered by a
    delusional, illogical liberal minority, and rabidly
    promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which
    holds forth the proposition that it is entirely
    possible to pick up a turd by the clean end!'

    A fear of weapons is a sign of retarded sexual and emotional maturity. Sigmund Freud

  6. #6
    CTR man's Avatar
    CTR man is offline Officer First Class
    Supporting Member Lvl 3
    Join Date
    05-20-06
    Location
    Ceres, CA
    Posts
    4,965
    Rep Power
    1169037
    Quote Originally Posted by 121Traffic View Post
    Since the FDA hasn't actually approved MJ for medicinal use (in fact, it's still against Federal law to possess it...medical marijuana is not recognized), doctors can't and don't actually prescribe it. They just fill out a note that says their patient might benefit from its use. It's a total joke.
    Thanks for the heads up. I knew there was a "joke" to it.

    Quote Originally Posted by pgg View Post
    He wants to claim a revenue stream but fails to realize the additional cost this is going to place us the taxpayers. Who is going to pay the health costs.. US. Who is going to pay for their needs and living when they can't support themselves.. US. who is going to have to pay to dispose of their carcasses when they die... US
    Plus, If you guys can't arrest them or have to look for other reasons to hook them up, then where would we be?


    Choose The Right. When you're doing whats right, then you have nothing to worry about.

    Not a LEO

    In memory of Sgt. Howard K. Stevenson 1965 - 2005. Ceres Police Dept.
    In memory of Robert N. Panos 1955 - 2008 Ceres Police Dept.









  7. #7
    mack's Avatar
    mack is offline Officer Resource Offical Auctioneer
    Premium Lifetime Member
    Join Date
    05-25-07
    Location
    SE Indiana, I love this weather!
    Posts
    3,388
    Rep Power
    555156
    Back in my youth I smoked pot, alot. I've never denied that fact. I have also spoken out against it often since. I know the lack of motivation it causes, and that it is a gateway substance. I do not think it should ever be legalized and will never smoke it again myself. I worked in a cancer clinic many moons ago and there was a woman who would eat pot in brownies following her treatment claiming that it helped her through the chemo side effects. She was a pretty straightlaced lady so I tended to believe her but I do not condone it being prescribed by doctors either.

    My dad, I miss him every day.

    Originally Posted by Wolven
    Life is too short to wear unsexy underwear.


    I am a female!!!!! LMAO

    Be who you are and say what you feel.....
    Because those that matter...don't mind...
    And those that mind...don't matter

  8. #8
    Join Date
    05-05-09
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    233
    Rep Power
    0
    I often do not see brought up in public discussion the ramifications of its use in other areas of society.

    Do you want the President and his Cabinet members to be high while making National Security decisions?
    What about the U.S. Supreme Court?
    How about a local judge presiding over a case.
    The local prosecutor.
    The officer on patrol.
    Your personal physician.
    Your surgeon.
    The childcare people that work where your kids stay at.

    Legalizing marijuana has far-reaching effects like this that are never brought to light. I know, I know. It's funny to think about some of these people being high. Sometimes, we refer to them saying, "They MUST be high to think that!" It's a very dangerous reality that people are just not seeing.

    The ultimate issue after whether it SHOULD be legal or not, is whether it's a States' Rights issue or is it something we leave in the hands of the Federal government.

  9. #9
    Xiphos's Avatar
    Xiphos is online now I Void Warranties
    Verified LEO
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    03-09-08
    Location
    Thermopylae
    Posts
    8,380
    Rep Power
    7798740
    Potheads are not going to go to the pharmacy to buy pot, and pay taxes on it, when they can grow it in their closet for free.
    Pleasing nobody, one person at a time.

    That which does not kill me, better start fucking running.

    If I lived every day like it was my last, the body count would be staggering.

    I intend to go in harm's way. -John Paul Jones

    Hunt the wolf, and bring light to the dark places that others fear to go. LT COL Dave Grossman

  10. #10
    Five-0's Avatar
    Five-0 is offline Super Moderator
    Premium Lifetime Member
    Verified LEO
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    05-15-06
    Posts
    10,982
    Rep Power
    8357019
    Quote Originally Posted by Xiphos View Post
    Potheads are not going to go to the pharmacy to buy pot, and pay taxes on it, when they can grow it in their closet for free.
    This is the thought that I always come to. The best moonshine in the Tennesse Valley isn't as good as commercial distillers like Jack Daniel's. However, homegrowers could grow pot that is as good or better than your local gubment store. The same or better product with no tax.....now let me think.

    Meanwhile, fishing in Russia:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkzV5AIK8iM
    "When plunder becomes a way of life for a group of men living together in society, they create for themselves in the course of time a legal system that authorizes it and a moral code that justifies it." -- Frederic Bastiat

    "Certainly there is no hunting like the hunting of man and those who have hunted armed men long enough and liked it, never really care for anything else thereafter." Ernest Hemingway

    The opinions given in my signatures & threads DO NOT reflect the opinions, views, policies, and/or procedures of my employing agency. They are my personal opinions only, thereby releasing my agency of any liability, or involvement in anything posted under the username "Five-0" on Officerresource.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    05-05-09
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    233
    Rep Power
    0
    Tru dat. Plus, what about when they're discontent with the potency of what the government regulation allows? They'll easily enough create their own "brand" if you will of stronger product.

  12. #12
    Morris is offline Chief Wheaties Pisser
    Verified LEO
    Join Date
    10-24-07
    Location
    Just outside Latteland
    Posts
    1,391
    Rep Power
    970814
    Classic case:

    In Washington state, smoking became a du jour evil so it was touted that there was a need to sin tax the hell out of cigarettes and tobacco in order to generate a revenue stream. Was decent, until smokers began to give up on the tobacco. Naturally, the reduction in tobacco products being sold meant that much less was coming into the coffers from the tax. Naturally, all of those programs designed to take advantage of the tobacco tax dollars suffered. Then you had the tribes making their own smokes or selling it, bypassing the state for taxes.

    Now, extrapolate that to marijuana. Legal or not, there will be a spike, then a decline as the taxes on MJ dry up.

    Doesn't matter if you legalize or ban it. Don't expect long term windfall revenues from a short term resolution to a problem.

    I voted no as my Dad was a respiratory therapist who showed me how bad smoking was plus a beloved grandfather dying from smoking related cancers.

  13. #13
    ex401mp's Avatar
    ex401mp is offline Was betrachten Sie?
    Verified LEO
    Join Date
    06-04-07
    Location
    Sw Florida
    Posts
    1,824
    Rep Power
    645328
    You want to really see how that affects people, just go to Amsterdam. Lots of those people started smoking the "legal" pot and hash, and alot of them now are passed out all over the place from the herion and crap they now do.
    Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you, Jesus Christ and the American G.I.
    One died for your soul, the other for your freedom. ~ Anon

    si hic carrus commovet non quaerete

    RIP Scott L. Roth- Pfc 1st Platoon,401st MP Co, KIA 12/20/89- Operation Just Cause- Not forgotten.
    ALWAYS FIRST!!!

 

 

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •