Eleven Boston police officers have been disciplined for their role in a steroid scandal that humiliated the department, forced officials to tighten their drug policies, and resulted in prison time for four patrolmen.
The disciplined officers, seven of whom admitted to using steroids at some point in their careers, received punishments ranging from a written reprimand to a 45-day suspension without pay. None of the officers was fired and none will face criminal charges, Boston Police Commissioner Edward F. Davis said yesterday.
“I am disappointed with the actions of the officers disciplined in this matter,’’ he said during a press conference at police headquarters. “We remain steadfast in our dedication to preserving the integrity of our department by taking every measure to prevent and when necessary uncover officer misconduct.’’

The punishments were the culmination of a three-year investigation into steroid use at the department that began in August 2006, soon after the FBI arrested Officer Roberto “Kiko’’ Pulido for trying to traffic cocaine. The FBI investigation revealed that Pulido, a steroid user, frequently guarded parties at an after-hours club in Hyde Park called the “Boom Boom Room.’’ At the club, located above an auto body shop at 24 Factory St., prostitutes and dancers mingled with police and alcohol and drugs were readily available.

Two of the 11 officers cited yesterday were disciplined for going to the club in uniform, while they were on duty.

Federal prosecutors ultimately launched a grand jury to investigate steroid use and after-hours parties within the department, but the acting US Attorney said yesterday the investigation had been closed.

Pulido pleaded guilty in November 2008 to charges that he conspired to traffic cocaine and heroin from Western Massachusetts to Jamaica Plain. He was sentenced to 26 years in federal prison. Three other officers also pleaded guilty on drug-related charges.

The disciplinary action announced yesterday ends one of the most embarrassing chapters in the department’s history, but questions linger about how effective the police can be in controlling steroid use in the department considering how difficult it is to test for the drug.

Steroid testing is much more expensive than other narcotics tests and can be less accurate, yielding false positives.

Davis said that after the federal investigation began, the department started training supervisors to spot signs of substance abuse, especially steroids.

Supervisors are also going through “integrity training,’’ which reviews the department’s ethics, like reporting other officers’ wrongdoing and looking for signs of possible corruption among officers.

One possible example: a patrolman who suddenly buys a luxury car.

Officers and recruits must also now take courses that teach the health risks of using anabolic steroids and recruits are being tested for the illegal substance.

The department also negotiated a new policy with the police unions, requiring officers who violate the drug abuse policy to be tested throughout their careers, instead of over just a three-year period.
The disciplined officers, seven of whom admitted to using steroids at some point in their careers, received punishments ranging from a written reprimand to a 45-day suspension without pay. None of the officers was fired and none will face criminal charges, Boston Police Commissioner Edward F. Davis said yesterday.