Welcome to the APBWeb.
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Jenna's Avatar
    Jenna is offline sheep
    Premium Lifetime Member
    Join Date
    06-11-06
    Posts
    24,390
    Rep Power
    4817860

    woman becomes naturalized US citizen 101 years after she came from Mexico in her mother's arms

    On October 12, 1909, Maturey was just a baby in her mother's arms crossing the Rio Grande on a ferry boat from Matamoros, Mexico, into Brownsville, Texas.
    In those days, crossing the border was a simple routine. There were no border patrol agents, and checkpoints focused on customs and trade issues, according to Anthony Knopp, a history professor at the University of Texas at Brownsville specializing in U.S.-Mexico border relations.
    "We were on the fringe back in those days," said Knopp. "It wasn't hard to cross the border. There was nobody looking to round people up and send them back to Mexico."
    In 1940, Congress passed the World War II Alien Registration Act, which made it a federal crime to advocate overthrowing the government. But the law also required noncitizens already in the country to register with the government. Maturey did so along with millions of others in the United States. Just before the start of World War II, Maturey received a "Certificate of Lawful Entry" card from the U.S. government issued to her on April 4, 1941. She never imagined that little document would make it possible for her to become a U.S. citizen. She figured it came with an expiration date.
    On October 12, 1909, Maturey was just a baby in her mother's arms crossing the Rio Grande on a ferry boat from Matamoros, Mexico, into Brownsville, Texas.
    In those days, crossing the border was a simple routine. There were no border patrol agents, and checkpoints focused on customs and trade issues, according to Anthony Knopp, a history professor at the University of Texas at Brownsville specializing in U.S.-Mexico border relations.
    "We were on the fringe back in those days," said Knopp. "It wasn't hard to cross the border. There was nobody looking to round people up and send them back to Mexico."

    In 1940, Congress passed the World War II Alien Registration Act, which made it a federal crime to advocate overthrowing the government. But the law also required noncitizens already in the country to register with the government. Maturey did so along with millions of others in the United States.
    Just before the start of World War II, Maturey received a "Certificate of Lawful Entry" card from the U.S. government issued to her on April 4, 1941. She never imagined that little document would make it possible for her to become a U.S. citizen. She figured it came with an expiration date.
    For decades, Maturey didn't really know what her legal status was in the United States. She feared asking too many questions might get her deported. She crossed the border routinely to visit family in Mexico. Border agents rarely asked for any documentation and when they did, she simply called herself a U.S. citizen.
    Then in 2008, the United States started requiring everyone to show a passport when crossing the border. Maturey knew she couldn't take anymore chances; it was time to find out once and for all where she stood.
    Maturey's niece, Yolanda Ovalle, took her to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office in Brownsville, and that's where they met Sheila Lucio, a 29-year veteran of the government agency.
    "I fell in love with her. She's real feisty," Lucio told CNN.
    When Lucio tried finding Eulalia Maturey's name in the computer system, she couldn't find it.
    "If you came to us before we entered the computer age, we didn't have your records," said Lucio.
    So Maturey pulled out that 69-year-old "Lawful Entry" card. Her niece says she took care of that little piece of paper for decades. "The permit is perfectly cared for," said Yolanda Ovalle. "She's a perfect lady."
    With that document, government officials were able to find her Legal Permanent Resident documents in the archives in Washington.
    "We would never have been able to establish her registration status without that document," said Maria Elena Garcia-Upson, a public affairs officer with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. "It would have been hard to prove."
    The paperwork is all squared away. Maturey passed the citizenship exam and now 101 years after that short ferry ride across the Rio Grande with her mother, Eulalia Maturey is set to become a citizen of the United States.
    For decades, Maturey didn't really know what her legal status was in the United States. She feared asking too many questions might get her deported. She crossed the border routinely to visit family in Mexico. Border agents rarely asked for any documentation and when they did, she simply called herself a U.S. citizen.
    Then in 2008, the United States started requiring everyone to show a passport when crossing the border. Maturey knew she couldn't take anymore chances; it was time to find out once and for all where she stood.
    "We would never have been able to establish her registration status without that document," said Maria Elena Garcia-Upson, a public affairs officer with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. "It would have been hard to prove." The paperwork is all squared away. Maturey passed the citizenship exam and now 101 years after that short ferry ride across the Rio Grande with her mother, Eulalia Maturey is set to become a citizen of the United States.
    More here: Woman, 101, to become U.S. citizen with help of 69-year-old document - CNN.com

  2. #2
    KaiGywer's Avatar
    KaiGywer is online now *insert witty remark here*
    Verified LEO
    Join Date
    01-02-06
    Location
    Mandan, ND
    Posts
    2,886
    Rep Power
    2764040
    As an immigrant myself, I truly admire those that come here legally
    Alpha Phi Sigma Alum - Alpha Delta Chapter
    ΑΦΣ

 

 

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •