Even the cops want to go to Yale

There are a lot of reasons police officers decide to switch agencies. Maybe the spouse took a job in another part of the country. Maybe the chief is such a toxic moron that jumping ship has become a mental health priority.

But more often than not, cops jump ship for another agency because of salary, especially now that defined benefit plans are an endangered species in most parts of the country.

In New Haven, Connecticut, the pay is decent. But only if you work for Yale University. If you work for the city, the pay’s not great.

New Haven pays first-year cops $44,400, which is the lowest pay in the state, according to a report in the New Haven Independent. In contrast, Yale starts cops at $67,000, and with way better benefits. Now 15 New Haven cops are hoping to get positions with the campus police at Yale.

Yale’s police force has three or four openings for patrol officers at the time this was written, Chief Ronnell Higgins told the Independent. More than 300 people, including the 15 New Haven police officers, have applied, he said.

There’s really nothing complicated about the dynamics. New Haven is poor. Yale is rich. If you have more money, you can pay more money to workers, as is evident when looking at police salaries in the Northeast, West Coast and the deep South.

New Haven police officers haven’t had a contract in two years. Considering that they make the least of any police officers in Connecticut, according to the paper, it’s hardly surprising they would want to work for to Yale Police.

Just look at what Yale offers. The starting salary for cops is $67,000 and is expected to rise to $76,300, with top patrol salaries at $96,000, according to Higgins. That’s more than what any other department in the state pays. Plus, Yale offers attractive benefits, including financial help to buy homes in the New Haven area and to pay their kids’ college tuition.

New Haven Police Chief Antony Campbell said he worries about a continuing shortage of New Haven cops, because his officers work under an expired contract. Given the discouraging contract prospects, he said he sees as many as 50 more cops leaving the department in coming months.

New Haven Police Chief Antony Campbell said he worries about a continuing shortage of New Haven cops, because his officers work under an expired contract. Given the discouraging contract prospects, he said he sees as many as 50 more cops leaving the department in coming months.

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