NYPD issues new strict social media policy as it investigates leaks

The NYPD has issued a new strict social media policy for its officers  — as the top brass tries to tamp down on leaks and Internal Affairs probes a union head’s often antagonistic online rhetoric, The Post has learned.

The new policy, which was issued on Feb. 12, tells officers not to post any information on cases they get from the job that hasn’t been made public — such as photos or videos from crime scenes.

In December, the NYPD subpoenaed the Twitter data from Post Police Bureau Chief Tina Moore’s account as part of its internal investigation into a crime scene photo Moore posted back in October 2019.

The news of the legal action came a week after the NYPD changed another patrol guide policy to crack down on photos and videos being shared with the press — which led to the suspension of a pair of cops who accessed and shared videos from the dramatic shooting inside a Bronx police station on Feb. 9.

The policy, Procedure No. 203-32, also appears to give the department some added leeway to go after union presidents if they choose.

The heads of the NYPD’s union have historically been given a bit more rope to speak out in the media to push their policy agenda — but one leader’s recent declaration of war on Mayor Bill de Blasio got the attention of the Internal Affairs Bureau.

Ed Mullins, the Sergeants Benevolent Association’s president and a fierce adversary of the mayor, is facing an internal probe over whether his tweets or other bombastic statements violated department policy.

The recent order says officers should not engage in any “manipulating of discourteous or disrespectful remarks, in any form, regarding another person’s ethnicity, race, religion, gender, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, and/or disability.”

“Members of the service are reminded that they are strictly accountable for their conduct at all times, inside or outside of New York City, whether on or off duty, including the use of personal social media account,” the policy adds.

It was unclear if the department would use this to rein in the rhetoric of NYPD’s union reps, who appear to still be in the honeymoon phase with Police Commissioner Dermot Shea.

His predecessor, James O’Neill, wasn’t as lucky.

O’Neill was often the target of harsh criticism from the city’s largest police union, the Police Benevolent Association, and the SBA.

Obvious restrictions, including not to contact witnesses, suspects, attorneys or minors they’ve interacted with as a cop, were also laid out for the members.

Additionally, cops cannot use anything in their handles that would identify their job or detail,  such as “@nypd_johndoe, @53pct_janedeo” and prohibits cops from posting any photos, with prior approval, of themselves or others on the force in uniform or with their ID, patches or badges, the document reads.

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